Oral Health Fits the Mission and Vision of Lions International

“WE SERVE”

Dan Snobl, M.Ed., RPT
Dan Snobl was the Director of Physical Therapy at Southwest Minnesota State University for 37 years and has extensive leadership experience in the Lion’s organization.


I joined Lions in 1982 in my home town of Tracy, Minnesota in Southwest Minnesota. The Tracy Club is part of Multiple District MD5M which number 21,262 strong, organized into 641 Clubs in 12 Districts located in Minnesota, Manitoba, and Northwest Ontario. Continue reading

The Case for Fluoride Varnish Interventions

Effective Strategies to Reduce Dental Caries

Amos Deinard Jr, MD, MPH
Medical Director and Founder of the Minnesota Oral Health Project


Caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood.1 Dental caries is the decay process, the end result of which is the cavity. It has reached silent epidemic proportions because no one writes about the problem, as compared to the frequent writings that appear in the lay press about mental health, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, etc.

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Brush Teeth for 2 Minutes 2 Times Per Day

I brush for 2

Caregiver Strategies for Successful Brushing

Elise Sarvas, DDS, MSD, MPH
Dental Director, Minnesota Oral Health Project and Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Developmental and Surgical Sciences, University of Minnesota


Most people know that they should brush their teeth twice a day. But not many realize that the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that they do so for TWO MINUTES each time. Two minutes can seem like an eternity when staring into the bathroom mirror – and even more so for kids.

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Baby Teeth Are Not Just for Babies Anymore

Cris Gilb

Dental cavities in our children and grandchildren is a public health crisis!

Cris Gilb, RN, PHN, MHA
Executive Director, Minnesota Oral Health Project


Dental cavities in the baby teeth of Minnesota’s children is a silent epidemic, even though cavities are preventable. An alarming number of children, nearly half of all children ages 2 – 11, have cavities in their primary (baby) teeth. Over half of children starting Kindergarten have already had a cavity. The numbers are even greater in children who come from families that near or below the Federal Poverty Level or are children of color.
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